eSignatures 2012 – ESRA Annual Conference starting Today, November 14 Reply

The Electronic Signature and Records Association Annual Conference, eSignatures 2012, is taking place today and tomorrow at the Embassy Row Hotel in Washington DC.  This year’s conference will be completely electronic, supporting the environment and the spirit of our Association; name tags will be the exception.

Access the full electronic Agenda on the website: http://esraconference.com/agenda

Access Speaker Bios on the website: http://esraconference.com/speakers/

Follow updates via Twitterhttps://twitter.com/esignrecords

eSignatures 2012 brings together thought leaders from major industries to share their knowledge and best practices:

  • Financial Services
  • Health Care
  • mCommerce
  • Technology
  • Legal

Some topics to be covered include eSign and Financial Services/Insurance, eSign and Health and Government Trends.

Hear from speakers such as:

  • Honorable John M. Facciola, United States Magistrate Judge, U.S. District Court, District of Columbia
  • Honorable Paul M. Grimm, Chief U.S. Magistrate Judge, U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland
  • Marcia Berner, ACORD
  • Bob Catlin, Signature Mortgage
  • James Sheire, U.S. Department of Commerce, NIST
  • Laura Hajducek, New York Life Insurance Company
  • David Whitaker, BuckleySandler LLP
  • …and more!

We are grateful for the support of our Sponsors!

CFPB Seeks Input on Conflict Between State and Federal Gift Card Laws Reply

E-Commerce News provided by BuckleySandler LLP for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal advice on any subject matter.

August 24, 2012

On August 16, the CFPB issued a Notice that it intends to make a preemption determination with  regard to two state gift card laws. The CFPB is seeking public comment to inform its response to requests that the CFPB address conflicts between the EFTA’s gift card expiration provisions and those in Maine’s and Tennessee’s laws. The Notice explains that Maine’s and Tennessee’s laws presume gift cards to be “abandoned” and release businesses from the obligation to honor the gift cards after two years of inactivity, while federal law generally prohibits the sale of a gift card with an expiration date under five years. The CFPB requests public comment on whether there is any inconsistency between the identified state and federal expiration date provisions and, if so, on the nature of the inconsistency. The CFPB also seeks comment on whether card issuers could comply with the federal and state laws as they currently exist, and whether the Maine and Tennessee laws provide greater consumer protection than the federal law.